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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
gun laws, in colorado, law enforcement officials say they need more money to conduct the surge in criminal background checks that are required for gun buyers. they are going to ask law makes for half a million dollars to speed up the process which used to take about half an hour and now takes about a week. process is free which has one lawmaker suggesting that those that want gun pay for it themselves. telling the denver post, quote, anyone else whether a teacher or law enforcement officer anyone needing a background check needs to pay for it. meantime, her it's already legal to carry a gun a record number of educators attended a training seminar earlier this week. >> we are teachers, all school employees for their application and permit to carry a firearm. in utah they have the advantage of beings able to carry one in schools. we do not restrict law abiding with a permit of carrying one in a school. >> hawaii, new hampshire and oregon allow them to carry one on campus. arizona and washington state looking into the proposal. it will face stiff resistance from gun control advoca
of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is for a vast future also." the words of abraham lincoln. jim from georgia on the republican line. caller: thank
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special account told by janet reno -- special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
>> and i have the right to petition the courts if the don't agree with a law. we are not going to all agree with every law that is passed. i don't agree with the laws that restrict contraception use now being put forth in different states around the country. i feel like those infringe on my rights as well. >> nothing infringes on your rights. >> you don't have to work at hobby lobby. economicception is an check issue for many women. >> this is about forcing the employer to give it to you for free. >> happy new. >> sean: and we continue to monitor here on the fox news channel america on the brink. the latest on the fiscal cliff. let not your heart be troubled. that is all the time we have left but greta is standing by >> juliet: wake up, everybody, it's saturday, december 29th. i'm juliet huddy. down to the wire for a fiscal cliff deal. and is it mitch mcconnell to the rescue. live in washington on the 11th hour negotiations. >> and did you know about to fall off the dairy cliff? >> juliet: have you seen the prices? >> dave: as high as 8 bucks a gallon for milk. >> clayton: oak
to be signed into law this is seen as retaliation for a new u.s. law that imposes travel and economic restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>> it was a black christmas? initial holiday numbers not very good. a report from master card said holiday sales growth slowed by more than half this year, and the weakest holiday shopping season since 2008. the report said shoppers were not in a subpoenai inspending m of the fiscal cliff threat and hurricane sandy. >>> box office gold for les miserables. it blew away all expectations. raking in $18 million on opening day. strong number one. and number two, jangle on chains, starring jamie fox and leonardo decap icaprio. and then the hob bot, parental guidance and jack reacher. >>> in the next half hour, we'll preview some of the top picks with christopher john farley of speak easy. "the wall street journal's" culture website. we'll look ahead to the movies. >>> ahead on "starting point," we showed you the winter weather in some parts of the country. the other danger? tornadoes. a man rolling the camera as he started to steer his family
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
for an american law that targets russian human rights violators. over the past two decades american families have adopted some 60,000 russian kids. the united nations children's fund estimates there are 740,000 orphans in the country with only a few thousand russians trying to adopt them. we will see an immediate impact. a russian official says 46 children whom americans are right in the process is of adopting right now you would not be able to leave the country. >> usually typically depending on the region a 10 day waiting period and those 46 parent ares, couples are in the ten day wait so it is devastating that they already met their child and started the bonding process. i can't even fathom what they are going through. >> heart break. and teleenviesed comments the president said countries should take care of their own and added with some sarcasm there are probably many places in the world where living standards are so higher than ours. so what, are we going to send our children there? maybe we should move there ourselves. children's rights advocates say it will have a strong effect with orphan
shootings, a familiar american policy-making consensus called for federal gun-control laws. more precisely, they want congress to pass the ban on big, dramatic-looking assault-type weapons that existed from 1994 until the law sun-setted in 2004. government, for the past 80 years, or so, has seen its purpose as mainly to respond to society's failures the moment they occur or whenever they are imagined. adam lanza killed with guns so modern, policy-making logic posits that government must pass a law. whether that law will accomplish its goal is irrelevant. policy-making has become an activity that supports the genetic and financial needs of policymakers and their follower tribes. the community's role, we've lately learned, is to provide revenue. where are we going with that? >> i think he started off in a legitimate direction where he talked about how much of the legislation is done with deadlines and during lame-duck sessions. we're responsive as opposed to getting proactive. i get where he's coming from with respect to failures with the assault weapons ban in 1994. if you had a ban prior t
was a veteran of u.s. military service. he also worked in many law enforcement positions. we're told. and he was in afghanistan, working for the contractor company dime corp. international, a major u.s. contractor in the war zone, working to help mentor and train afghan police forces. this is the latest of the so-called insider attacked that have plagued the forces over the past year. many active duty forces killed, contract contractors. 50 deaths this year. they haven't been able to get a handle on it. hala? >> and these attacks have been increasing. what is the reason behind the increase in attacks. >> this is -- they have increased throughout the year, but over the course of the year, ebbed and flowed, thankfully where there hasn't been one in several weeks. the military, the intelligence effort in the military has been to try to figure out the answer to that very question. what is going on. why is this happening? some of them are said to be taliban infiltrations. but there is a sense we're told that many of them are due, how to describe it, to cultural differences. afghans who feel a gru
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11